CO2 extraction is one of the most common ways CBD is extracted from the hemp or cannabis plants. This method uses expensive equipment that adjusts temperature and pressure to extract the cannabinoids from the plant material, without damaging them. The other common method is to use solvents like ethanol or butane to extract the plant material. These solvents have to be burned off the final product which may damage the cannabinoids or terpenes in the process. There is also a risk that these solvents may not have burned off completely and could end up in your end product.
Not all CBD is created equally. Some tinctures are created with little regard to overall consumer safety, and may contain harmful chemicals and pesticides. Other CBD products have been shown to differ from what the label says, either with way more cannabidiol, or way less. In some cases, the THC content was elevated above the federal legal limit for hemp extracts.
Cannabis grabbed all the headlines when Colorado legalized it on November 6, 2012 by passing Amendment 64. What most people don’t know is that hemp (the cultivar of cannabis with less than .3% THC) was allowed to be cultivated (originally in Kentucky and later in Colorado and Tennessee) under the 2014 farm bill. Hemp was grown initially as a pilot project, but as of today the US Congress is close to removing the Schedule 1 status of hemp. Removing the draconian Schedule 1 status as a controlled substance would allow hemp to grown in all of The United States. 
CBD topicals: Many people take CBD to manage chronic pain. These folks may find  CBD topicals particularly therapeutic, as they can massage the CBD into the skin of the area causing them pain. Dosing can be more imprecise with CBD topicals, and you may need to reapply often to continue feeling the effect. CBD topicals describes a broad category of products including CBD balms, lotions, chopsticks, and creams.

The majority of users prefer full spectrum products because they provide synergistic benefits of the whole plant. These products include an array of the naturally-occurring cannabinoids and terpenes from cannabis. Full spectrum CBD oil has up to 0.3% THC to produce the “entourage effect.” CBD oil products with zero THC are known as either “broad spectrum” or “isolates.” These products are generally preferred by those who want to use CBD but either have an aversion to THC or concerns about drug testing.
Not all CBD is created equally. Some tinctures are created with little regard to overall consumer safety, and may contain harmful chemicals and pesticides. Other CBD products have been shown to differ from what the label says, either with way more cannabidiol, or way less. In some cases, the THC content was elevated above the federal legal limit for hemp extracts.
The vast majority of CBD oils come in bottles measuring either 15 milliliters (mL), or 0.5 ounces; or 30 mL, or 1 ounce. However, CBD concentration is more important than bottle size. Concentration refers to the ratio of hemp oil solution (measured in mL) compared to the amount of CBD cannabinoid (measured in milligrams, or mg). A 15-mL bottle may contain 100 mg of CBD, 300 mg, 500 mg, or more. The higher the mg amount, the stronger the CBD oil will be. For this reason, the ‘mg’ measurement is also referred to as the oil’s strength; i.e., 400-mg oil might be called 400-strength oil.
CBD oil is prohibited for sale by terms of service on the major online marketplaces, including Amazon, eBay, and Groupon. Most of the products sold as CBD oil on those websites are hemp seed oil and don’t contain any CBD. We’ve also heard many reports of counterfeit and potentially dangerous products being sold as CBD oil on those websites. Your safest option is to always buy directly from the CBD company’s official website.
The tricky part is that there's some evidence suggesting CBD works best for pain when combined with a little THC, says Dr. Danesh. "Depending on what type of pain you have, you might be able to do just CBD, but sometimes you need CBD and THC." This makes accessing a product that will actually help you more difficult due to different regulations in each state. In New York, where Dr. Danesh practices, for example, CBD is available over the counter. But as soon as you add THC, you need a prescription. 

Historically, hemp could legally be grown and cultivated for academic research purposes only. However, the legality of hemp growth has changed in the past year. In April 2018, Sen. Mitch McConnell of Kentucky introduced the Hemp Farming Act of 2018, a piece of legislation that proposed legalizing all hemp products at the federal level. The act was incorporated in the 2018 United States Farm Bill, which passed in both the House and Senate in December 2018. Per the farm bill, industrial hemp will be descheduled as a federally controlled substance.
And now, onto the thorny issue of legality. The simple answer to the question is yes — if it is extracted from hemp. The 2014 Farm Bill established guidelines for growing hemp in the U.S. legally. This so-called “industrial hemp” refers to both hemp and hemp products which come from cannabis plants with less than 0.3 percent THC and are grown by a state-licensed farmer.
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